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PLEASE NOTE: The schedule posted here is as of 1/25/16, and is subject to change. Please check back for updates.

Tuesday, January 26 • 4:00pm - 4:20pm
The Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide as a Non-Physical Barrier For Fish Movement

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AUTHORS: Caleb T. Hasler*, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Clark E. Dennis III, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Adam W. Wright, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Jennifer D. Jeffrey, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Michael R. Donaldson, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Shivani Adhikari, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Jon Amberg, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, United States Geological Survey, Mark Gaikowski, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, United States Geological Survey, Cory D. Suski, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois

ABSTRACT: Invasive Asian carp are currently contained within the Mississippi River basin but are nearing the Great Lakes. Development of novel barriers would provide means to prevent Asian carp from spreading and may offer unique tools to manage fish in the wild. This presentation summarizes several studies designed to quantify the effectiveness of CO2 to act as a non-physical barrier. First, laboratory studies designed to quantify fish behavior and avoidance caused by elevated CO2 were undertaken. Second, studies conducted in artificial ponds were performed to identify if the movement of free-swimming fishes in a field setting would be influenced by the presence of a zone of elevated CO2. Results demonstrate that fish avoid CO2 in the lab setting and lose equilibrium when exposed to high levels of CO2. Free-swimming fishes in a pond environment will avoid areas of elevated CO2, and that it is indeed feasible to treat large volumes of water (almost 2 million gallons) with CO2 to a level that excludes fish. Together, these studies demonstrate that CO2 has potential as a barrier to prevent the spread of Asian carp, and that the barrier has potential to be applied over extended time periods and at large scales.

Tuesday January 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:20pm
Pantlind

Attendees (25)