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Tuesday, January 26 • 2:00pm - 2:20pm
The Institute For Fisheries Research: An 85-Year History of Fisheries Research in Michigan

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AUTHORS: Kevin Wehrly*, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Institute for Fisheries Research; Jim Breck, University of Michigan, Institute for Fisheries Research; Zhenming Su, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Institute for Fisheries Research; David Clapp, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Charlevoix Fisheries Research Station; Todd Wills, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Lake St Clair Fisheries Research Station; Troy Zorn, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Marquette Fisheries Research Station; Gary Whelan Michigan Department of Natural Resources

ABSTRACT: The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has a long and important history of fisheries research in Michigan. The Institute for Fisheries Research, a cooperative unit between the University of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, was founded in 1930 by Dr. Carl Hubbs who recognized that more knowledge on fish life history and aquatic habitats was needed to effectively manage fisheries. Much of the early work conducted by staff at the Institute was pioneering and played a pivotal role in the development of fisheries management. For example, by 1945, Hubbs, his predecessors, and a host of graduate students had implemented, developed, and evaluated essentially all of the concepts of modern day fisheries management. They used an inventory of streams and lakes to determine suitable management methods, developed and evaluated lake and stream improvement methods, used the creel census to measure game fish yield, analyzed stream and lake fish populations, determined the success of different methods of stocking, and initiated studies of fish migration, growth rates, food habits, fish predators, use of rotenone, spawning habits, and relationships among game and forage species. Today, the Institute for Fisheries Research continues to be a leader in fisheries research focusing on landscape-based modeling, classification, and assessment; ecological energetics; assessing climate change vulnerability; survey sampling and design; and conservation planning. We review the legacy of inland research conducted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources discuss its importance in Michigan and beyond.

Tuesday January 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm EST
Pearl