Loading…
NEW THIS YEAR! The schedule of technical sessions is in Sched.org which allows you to search within the schedule, filter the schedule to show sessions only occurring on a certain date, within a track, or in a room. You can also build your own schedule by creating a free account in Sched.org. Click here to return to the main Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference website. 

PLEASE NOTE: The schedule posted here is as of 1/25/16, and is subject to change. Please check back for updates.

View analytic
Monday, January 25 • 1:40pm - 2:00pm
Most Chinook Salmon Stocked Into Northern Lake Huron Have Been Feeding in Lake Michigan Since The Collapse of Alewives in Lake Huron

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

AUTHORS: Rick Clark*, Quantitative Fisheries Center, Michigan State University; Reneé Reilly, Quantitative Fisheries Center, Michigan State University; James R. Bence, Quantitative Fisheries Center, Michigan State University; Randall M. Claramunt, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Charlevoix Fisheries Research Station; John A. Clevenger, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Charlevoix Fisheries Research Station; Matthew S. Kornis, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office; Charles R. Bronte, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office; Charles P. Madenjian, U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center; and Edward F. Roseman, U.S. Geological Survey, Great Lakes Science Center

ABSTRACT: Alewives are preferred food of Great Lakes Chinook salmon. Alewife abundance declined to near zero in Lake Huron (LH) in 2004 and has subsequently remained low. In contrast, alewife abundance in Lake Michigan (LM) has remained comparatively high. We wondered if this abrupt change in relative abundance between lakes affected movement patterns of Chinook salmon. We compared movements before (1993-1997) and after (2008-2014) the alewife collapse using recapture locations of Chinook salmon tagged and released at similar sites in each lake; Medusa Creek in LM and Swan River in LH. Both sites are about 80 kilometers from the boundary between lakes. We aggregated recaptures into seasonal periods; April-July and August-October. Based on the life history of Chinook salmon, we assumed that the primary reason for movements in the first period was feeding and the primary reason for movements in the second period was spawning. We found that over 90% of recaptures in 1993-1997 were from within the same lake where fish were stocked regardless of season. That is, Medusa fish fed in LM and returned to Medusa Creek to spawn, and Swan fish fed in LH and returned to Swan River to spawn. After the collapse of alewives in LH, Medusa fish continued the same pattern, but Swan fish changed their feeding location to LM. Over 90% of recaptures of Swan fish in 2008-2014 were in LM during the feeding season, and the spatial distribution of recaptures was similar to that of Medusa fish. The distribution was centered in the Ludington-Manistee area of LM, more than 250 kilometers from the boundary between the lakes. Fish returned to their respective release sites in the spawning season. We concluded that most Chinook salmon stocked into Northern LH since the collapse of alewives have been feeding in LM.

Monday January 25, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
Ambassador W