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Monday, January 25 • 3:00pm - 3:20pm
Effects of Macrophytes on Zooplankton Abundance and Composition

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AUTHORS: Hailey Yondo*, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; Joel K. Nohner, Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; William W. Taylor; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

ABSTRACT: Zooplankton are important for water quality, healthy ecosystems, and productive sport fisheries in lakes, but their populations may be influenced by anthropogenic changes to littoral habitat. Zooplankton are a primary food source for juvenile sport fish, and are vital to sport fish natural reproduction. In addition to supporting healthy fisheries, zooplankton consume phytoplankton, increasing water clarity and improving the aesthetic and environmental quality of Michigan lakes. Zooplankton are found in both pelagic and littoral habitats of lakes. This study focused on zooplankton in the littoral zone, where lakeshore property owners often remove macrophytes. We analyzed the differences in zooplankton species richness and biomass between two littoral habitats: 0% macrophyte cover (bare sediment) and 100% macrophyte cover. We sampled 8 random locations in the littoral zone of Chancellor Lake in Mason County, Michigan for zooplankton. Zooplankton were collected across three time periods (August 4, September 1, and October 1, 2014) using a depth integrated zooplankton tow at a standard length of 3 m. Zooplankton were preserved in ethanol and a subsample were identified to order and enumerated. We measured the total length of the zooplankton using Dummyname image analysis software and used these measurements to estimate zooplankton biomass based on published length-mass regressions. Information will be presented on the differences in zooplankton species richness and biomass based on the presence or absence of macrophytes. The results from this study will benefit inland lakes fisheries and ecosystem management by assessing the potential impact of macrophyte removal on zooplankton populations.

Monday January 25, 2016 3:00pm - 3:20pm
Emerald B

Attendees (21)